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Browse through CECAN's past events.

CECAN Syllabus CPD Workshop: 'Qualitative Comparative Analysis'

 

CECAN Syllabus

CECAN - Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Tuesday 19th June 2018, 11:00 - 15:00 (registration 10:30)

University of Surrey, Guildford, UK

 

Course Details: This workshop is part of the CECAN Module for future policy analysts and evaluators. The syllabus was developed to support capacity building nationally and internationally in the evaluation of complex policy and programmes.

This session introduces qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) - a case-based approach that relies on Boolean algebra, which crudely speaking is a way of sorting differentiating units or cases according to whether they share or do not share particular configurations of attributes. 

 

Learning outcomes:

By the end of this session, students will have gained knowledge of:

CECAN Seminar with Claes Andersson - The Spectrum of Overwhelming Systems

 

CECAN Seminar with Claes Andersson

You are warmly invited to register for a CECAN Seminar with Professor Claes Andersson of Chalmers University of Technology - discussing the 'Spectrum of Overwhelming Systems.'

BEIS, 1 Victoria Street, London, SW1H 0ET

16th May 2018  12.45-2pm

Seminar Overview

In a 2014 paper in Futures we explored the relatively straightforward proposition that societal systems combine two qualities that are commonly referred to as complexity and complicatedness. Why do societal systems remain recalcitrant despite the fact that we have powerful approaches for dealing with both these qualities. We claim that the combination between complexity and complicatedness is emergent: fundamentally and irreducibly different from either quality in isolation.

CECAN Syllabus CPD Workshop: 'Designing Evaluations for Complex Policy Interventions 2018'

 

CECAN Syllabus

CECAN - Designing Evaluations for Complex Policy Interventions 2018

Tuesday 15th May 2018, 09:00 - 17:30

University of Surrey, Guildford, UK

 

Course Details: This workshop is part of the CECAN Module for future policy analysts and evaluators. The syllabus was developed to support capacity building nationally and internationally in the evaluation of complex policy and programmes.

The course covers the main strategies, approaches and methods that an evaluator or evaluation commissioner might want to use to tackle the challenges of complexity social science and policy evaluation. It examines complexity and its role in evaluation and social science research and the methodological challenges this can pose for evaluation of complex policy and programmes. The course is an essential conceptual preparation for the short courses on specific methods for complex policy evaluation offered by CECAN.

 

Session 1: Policy Research and Evaluation:

CECAN Seminar on Mixed Methods Evaluation, using QCA and NVIVO

india

CECAN Seminar with Professor Wendy Olsen, University of Manchester. 

20th April 2018. BEIS, 1 Victoria Street, London. 12.45pm-2pm.

Theorising Bangladesh Indebtedness and Using Mixed-Methods Evaluation, Taking Into Account Gender/Class Realities:  Using QCA and NVIVO  

In development studies, one wants an evaluation team to face up to the challenge of combining surveys with semi-structured interview data.  In this seminar I explain and show how these linkages are made with concrete data about villages in Bangladesh and India.  The problem is that complex data can overwhelm the interpreting team. The solutions I offer here are methodologically sound.

CECAN Seminar: How evaluation in the SDG era can mislead, and what to do about it

 

SDGs

CECAN Seminar - How evaluation in the SDG era can mislead, and what to do about it

Tuesday 27th February 2018, 12:45 - 14:00 - BEIS, 1 Victoria Street, London, SW1H 0ET

 

About the seminar:

Professionals in evaluation pay a lot of attention to how to evaluate. We are less thoughtful about exactly what to evaluate, and why. Stakeholders’ interests and questions tend to determine what will be useful to focus on at a particular point in time. Or we use a predetermined set of criteria, usually the so-called DAC criteria - relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability - to direct and focus evaluations. Yet this widely accepted practice can prompt us to neglect important issues that should be on our agenda if we are serious about the role of evaluation in supporting sustainable development, and understanding whether we are on track to achieve the SDGs. Failure to focus our evaluations appropriately can lull us into dangerous complacency about accomplishment and success.